• Hola from Bahía de los Angeles!

    Posted on August 19th, 2010 joelbarkan No comments
    The five high school students of Ocean Discovery Institute’s Pesca Research Group, under the leadership of 2010 MAS graduate Joel Barkan, are writing to update the CMBC community about some exciting research we’re doing to analyze bycatch in artisanal gillnet fisheries.
    For the past four years, our experiments have tested the effectiveness of attaching visual cues such as LED lights, chemical lightsticks, and shark-shaped cutouts to gillnets in an attempt to deter green sea turtles from becoming entangled.   Our previous research, which was recently published in June volume of Marine Ecology Progress Series, has indicated that these cues significantly reduced green sea turtle bycatch.  This year, we are in the process of testing a new source of illumination:  with the help of our lead scientist Dr. John Wang, we have created luminescent nets that charge under the sun and glow during the nighttime fishing hours.  We recently returned from a trip to Punta Abreojos, on the Pacific coast of Baja, California, to test our experimental nets on a population of green sea turtles.
    We also run our experiments with the local fishermen in Bahia de los Angeles to analyze the effects of our nets on the catch rates and value of the local bottom-set gillnet fishery.  The fishermen’s input is valuable because our product is designed for their use; if they’re not willing to adapt to our modified nets, then we need to find a more practical solution.  We have built an excellent relationship with these fishermen over the years and our research would not be possible without their dedication.
    Our Pesca group consists of five high school students within the Ocean Leaders intiative of Ocean Discovery Institute, a non-profit organization based in San Diego.  We are here in Bahía de los Angeles  as part of Ocean Discovery Institute’s annual BAHÍA program, in which approximately 15-20 inner-city youth spend five weeks at a field station in Bahía de los Angeles conducting scientific research on fisheries, wetlands, and islands.  Our summer in Bahía is almost over.  We hope the rest of our experience is as amazing as the first part has been!
    Sincerely,
    Richard Alvarez, Cielo Corado, Maria Puga, Carlos Rodriguez, Diem Tran-Hong, and Joel Barkan

    The five high school students of Ocean Discovery Institute’s Pesca Research Group, under the leadership of 2010 MAS graduate Joel Barkan, are writing to update the CMBC community about some exciting research we’re doing to analyze bycatch in artisanal gillnet fisheries.
    For the past four years, our experiments have tested the effectiveness of attaching visual cues such as LED lights, chemical lightsticks, and shark-shaped cutouts to gillnets in an attempt to deter green sea turtles from becoming entangled.   Our previous research, which was recently published in June volume of Marine Ecology Progress Series, has indicated that these cues significantly reduced green sea turtle bycatch.  This year, we are in the process of testing a new source of illumination:  with the help of our lead scientist Dr. John Wang, we have created luminescent nets that charge under the sun and glow during the nighttime fishing hours.  We recently returned from a trip to Punta Abreojos, on the Pacific coast of Baja, California, to test our experimental nets on a population of green sea turtles.
    We also run our experiments with the local fishermen in Bahia de los Angeles to analyze the effects of our nets on the catch rates and value of the local bottom-set gillnet fishery.  The fishermen’s input is valuable because our product is designed for their use; if they’re not willing to adapt to our modified nets, then we need to find a more practical solution.  We have built an excellent relationship with these fishermen over the years and our research would not be possible without their dedication.
    Our Pesca group consists of five high school students within the Ocean Leaders intiative of Ocean Discovery Institute, a non-profit organization based in San Diego.  We are here in Bahía de los Angeles  as part of Ocean Discovery Institute’s annual BAHÍA program, in which approximately 15-20 inner-city youth spend five weeks at a field station in Bahía de los Angeles conducting scientific research on fisheries, wetlands, and islands.  Our summer in Bahía is almost over.  We hope the rest of our experience is as amazing as the first part has been!
    Sincerely,
    Richard Alvarez, Cielo Corado, Maria Puga, Carlos Rodriguez, Diem Tran-Hong, and Joel Barkan